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Crusader12 Envato team says

Just curious as to how some authors are planning on dealing with jQuery 1.9/2.0… Is anyone going to be releasing scripts with support for both versions?

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CodingJack says

I guess it will depend on a few things with IE8 being the biggest question. Personally I can’t wait to drop support for IE8 .

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VF says

For me it would be just a complete jump into jQuery 2.0 rather than supporting both. This requires dropping IE8 support which I will gladly do by pointing the same on item description for new CC items. Especially if I test something on Windows 8 device (IE10), I wont consider testing the same on IE8 ;)

Regarding ThemeForest, I guess we can’t simply skip IE8 as per this post which indirectly means jQuery 1.9 can’t be skipped:

http://themeforest.net/forums/thread/internet-explorer-8-compatibility-is-still-required/80910?page=1
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SurStudio says

I think should stop using jQuery. I mean, really, 90kb of minified code is waaaay too much. Hopefully somebody will come up with some jQuery Lite to just select elements, and perhaps to make animations.

There’s a very easy way to check whether a website is abusing of jQuery: listen if the CPU fan spins faster xD

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VF says

^ Since jQuery 2.0 doesn’t support IE8 and below, it comes with huge fat loss ;)

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SurStudio says

^ Since jQuery 2.0 doesn’t support IE8 and below, it comes with huge fat loss ;)

I’m not so sure about that: http://blog.jquery.com/2012/06/28/jquery-core-version-1-9-and-beyond/

How much smaller/faster will jQuery 2.0 be? We won’t know until we’re done, or at least close to being done. You can bet that we’ll tell you more as the release date for 2.0 draws near. Better yet, you can try the beta when it is released and see for yourself!

Just checked http://jquery.com/, couple of funny things:

PRODUCTION (32KB, Minified and Gzipped)

They are desperate to make people think that is small!

Google is using jQuery

Yeah, right!

What does jQuery code look like? Here’s the quick and dirty: $(“p.neat”).addClass(“ohmy”).show(“slow”);

This is Internet’s cancer

xDDDD

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CodingJack says

There’s a very easy way to check whether a website is abusing of jQuery: listen if the CPU fan spins faster xD

This is probably with regards to animating stuff. But lots of developers aren’t animating with jQuery anymore.

You make a good point about jQuery’s necessity and once IE8 support is dropped the need to use it will be less. But I’m sure I’m still going find lots of times where it comes in handy. And in 2.0, supposedly you’re going to be able to configure a build similar to Modernizr for size concerns.

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VF says

What does jQuery code look like? Here’s the quick and dirty: $(“p.neat”).addClass(“ohmy”).show(“slow”);

This is Internet’s cancer

xDDDD

The readability of code is a private concern – an issue between a coder and a team who related with development – not internet’s real problem. And the same is true for even pure javascript.

Regarding performance, I guess if the core optimized for least memory and good rendering performance, the file size doesn’t going to be a problem. The major improvement I expect is the framework to take care all the browser prefix based jobs for style – if possible zero efforts from us on that area, which I believe possible as of release 2.0

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CodingJack says

The major improvement I expect is the framework to take care all the browser prefix based jobs for style – if possible zero efforts from us on that area, which I believe possible as of release 2.0

This would be a huge reason to use it and I’d love to see bulletproof HTML5 and CSS3 handling as well.

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Crusader12 Envato team says

It will definitely be interesting, and hopefully an easy transition. I’m looking forward to the build your own jQuery, but really… how useful/detrimental will that be to us as authors? Perhaps Themeforest should implement a rule about using the full version of jQuery (if their template relies on jQuery) so CodeCanyon plugins and other plugins aren’t fumbling.

IE8 support will need to be mandatory for a bit longer. Interestingly enough though, IE is making a little comeback with 9/10. Both seem to be excellent browsers and I’m noticing fastest JavaScript animations in IE.

jQuery is a great tool for the selector engine alone. :) Vendor prefix cleanup would be nice, I’m hoping for some integrated gesture events

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